Common Mullein Tincture

Verbascum thapsus Tincture

Common Mullein Tincture
Common Mullein Tincture Common Mullein Tincture
Brand: BotanicalsWildcrafted
Product Code: mulleintinc
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Mullein leaf fresh tincture, harvested in niagara region.

Common Mullein Tincture
Botanical Name Verbascum thapsus
Common names Mullein, Common Mullein, Great Mullein, Torches, Candlewick plant, Hag's taper, Aaron's rod, Jacob's staff , Our lady's flannel, Beggar's blanket, Hare's beard, Velvet dock, Rag paper, Wild ice leaf, Bullock' lungwort, Clown's lungwort, Blanket herb, Feltwort, Quaker rouge, White Mullein
Strength 1:2 40% : 1/8 veg. Glycerine
Best Before 2018
Dissolved Solids (µS/ppm) 0.69 / 480
Refractive Index 1.3595
pH 5.8
Excerpt From The: Eclectic Materia Medica, Pharmacology and Therapeutics
by Harvey Wickes Felter, M.D.
1922

VERBASCUM.

The leaves and tops of Verbascum Thapsus, Linné (Nat. Ord. Scrophulariaceae). A biennial common in the United States. Dose, 5 to 30 grains.

Common Name: Mullein.

Principal Constituents.—A volatile oil, a bitter principle, mucilage and resins.

Preparation.—Specific Medicine Verbascum. Dose, 5 to 30 drops.

Specific Indications.—Nervous and bronchial irritation, with cough; and urinary irritation with painful micturition.

Action and Therapy.—Mullein is demulcent, diuretic and sedative. It is also thought to have feeble anodyne properties. A syrup of mullein, prepared with the addition of lemon juice, is a fairly good sedative for irritation of the trachea and bronchi with persistent cough. It is applicable to dry, hoarse coughs which annoy the patient when lying down, as well as to cough associated with abundant catarrhal discharges. The specific medicine may be used for the same purposes. A so-called oil of mullein, or rather mulleinized oil, prepared by steeping the blossoms in oil in the sun, has a fabulous reputation of being curative in earache from otitis media. A truer preparation is prepared by exposing the blossoms alone in a bottle to the heat of the sun. Owing to the small yield and the consequent high price it is seldom used, and probably is no more efficient than mulleinized oil, a concoction of very doubtful utility.

Disclaimer
Any claims made in the above excerpt(s) are the opinions of the authors and are presented here for historical and reference purposes only. They are not intended to diagnose or treat diseases or symptoms, nor do they constitute medical advice.
Excerpt From The:
Ethnobotany of the Forest Potawatomi
by Huron H.Smith
1933

Common Mullein (Verbascum Thapsus L.)“waboî'anîbag” [blanket leaf].

The Forest Potawatomi smoke the dried leaves in a pipe to get relief from asthma. This practice may have been learned from the white people or vice versa. They smudge the leaves and inhale them for curing catarrh. The leaves are also smudged to revive one who has lost consciousness. Among the whites,the plant is known among eclectic practitioners for its demulcent, diuretic, anodyne, anti-spasmodic and vulnerary properties. Another authoritystates that the leaves and the flowers are used for their demulcent, anodyne, diuretic and anti-spasmodic properties. An infusion of the leaves is used for coughs, catarrh, breathing from the mouth, as a diaphoretic, a blood purifier and for piles and bowel complaints. The fomentation of the leaves in hot vinegar and water has been used locally to allay the inflammation in piles, ulcers, tumors and mumps. Eclectic practitioners have required the patient to inhale the steam from the leaves for acute inflammaton of the tonsils and malignant sore throats.
Disclaimer
Any claims made in the above excerpt(s) are the opinions of the authors and are presented here for historical and reference purposes only. They are not intended to diagnose or treat diseases or symptoms, nor do they constitute medical advice.
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